No Picture
Good Health

Mobile Phone Health Risks

Mobile phone health risks concern send shockwaves rippling through the cancer research community in 2008 when Dr. Ronald B. Herberman, director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute in the US, sent a nerve jerking memo to his staff warning them about excessive use of mobile phones and the danger it may pose in activating cancer cells in your body. His greater area of concern was children and teens, whose brains are fragile and still developing.
Children and teens are more susceptible to genetic damage because the tissues in their brains and bodies are still growing and their cells are rapidly dividing, therefore the primary reason they should strictly limit the use of mobile phones. “Mobile phone health risks” has a higher level of susceptibility in children and teenagers and brings into sharp focus the types of health risks that the radio wave scientific data are now showing, coupled with the significantly higher penetration of radio wave radiation into their heads, brains, and eyes calls for immediate action to protect these young and vulnerable ones.
Adults are by no means out of the woods with high level of mobile phone health risks. Over the past few of years there has been much concern over the use of these phones and how they can be severely damaging to our health. Many are convinced with adequate amount of data, that the radiation given off by these phones could be harmful to us and that this could even result in cancerous growths developing in our brains.
One other frightening claim which has been around recently is the fact that our brains could be heating up from the radiation given off by these phones. However it does seem to be the case that excessive use of mobile phones really does seem to be the main problem. But it is just a matter of time before we are really going to find out exactly how or if the use of these phones is truly dangerous as we believe now, when the first generation of mobile phone users reach the ripe old age of sixty and up.
Never-the-less, there is no shortage of substantial research about mobile phone health risks. In 2005 a study in Turkey showed that long-term exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RFEMF) from the use of mobile phones could increase free radical levels in your brain, raising the risk of brain cancer. Again – nothing conclusive just yet.
In all of this mobile phone health risks concern, we are only as healthy as our cells. and when we think of health and vitality, few of us imagine the cell. Healthy cell life produces lots of energy and vitality – a high level of energy and resistance to stress. But how do we make sure our cells are working at full capacity on the energy level? The good news is, it’s not as hard as it may sound, because scientific research shows that good nutrition is the key.…

No Picture
Health Department

What If We Had Universal Health Care?

With roughly 40 million Americans without health care insurance, and the current political debate of Healthcare Reform, one has to ask themselves what if we had universal health care in this country? While the number seems extremely large, many of those are young healthy Americans who see no need in purchasing insurance. Others who are not insured are denied because of preexisting conditions, financially incapable of purchasing insurance, or are between jobs. With these individuals who are uninsured, many seek medical care in emergency rooms, driving up the health cost for individuals who are insured. Many people believe the U.S. health system is second rate to other countries health operations.
What If We Had Universal Health Care?
Any person seeking basic medical care would be able to access hospitals, doctors, and clinics with a universal health care system. Just to note, I’m not specifying how much would actually be funded by the government, that still remains a political issue. Other wealthy countries have a system of this sort in place, but there are other models that are possible as well. In 2006 the city of San Francisco implemented universal health care. Although many individuals complained of the policy, because they felt it hindered the city by not enticing new businesses in choosing San Francisco as a location. Employers with 20 or more workers have to contribute a dollar per hour to help offset the nearly 200 million price tag. Employers with more than 100 workers are required to pay a $1.60 an hour, and up to $180 monthly maximum per worker. Yes it does seem rather steep, but it does seem like a moral obligation to each other.
The problem that may arise from universal care is the simple supply and demand model. If health care becomes easily obtainable, the demand for it will have a sharp increase resulting in abuse of the system. To exaggerate a little, the country just might become hypochondriacs. Not only that the number of people actually insured is going to decrease as well. People will no longer see a need for obtaining insurance if the government is going to cover basic health needs. When individuals and families begin to take advantage of the universal care the burden on physicians and clinics are going to increase, resulting in long waits and delays. For instance people with health insurance with low or zero deductibles use health services more frequently than those with high deductibles. In contrast universal care is like having a zero deductible resulting in over use of health care facilities. Which would result in a demand for health care workers, which would provide jobs that the economy could use at this moment. My question for you all to ponder is this, how would physicians adjust if universal health care became a reality in the United States?…

No Picture
Health Store

Lemons Give Your Health a Lift

Although lemons are a really good health food, I don’t think many people really think about them when considering a healthy diet. However, they are much more than a garnish for your iced tea! When you consider that lemons are a citrus fruit, it might make it a little easier to think of them as health foods. All citrus fruits are high in flavonoids, which are antioxidants believed to fight cell damage that leads to cancer, heart disease, and other health problems.
Lemons are especially good on the cancer fighting front. They contain a compound called limonene. This special phytonutrient had been shown to have anticancer properties in laboratory animals. It seems likely that it would also have an anticancer effect for humans, too.
Citrus limonoids are also shown in tests to fight neuroblastoma tumors. They also help prevent cancers of the breast, colon, lung, mouth, skin and stomach. From research done with limonoids, scientists think they may work so well because they stay in the bloodstream for a long time. Besides all this, not only are lemons an excellent source of vitamin C, but they also contain a good amount of vitamin A, folate, calcium and potassium. They’re full of good things that are good for you!
Adding a slice of lemon to your water is one way to use fresh lemons. Of course, you can also make lemonade. A large lemon will yield about three to four tablespoons of juice, and yields more juice when warm. Rolling a lemon around under the palm of your hand on a flat surface will also increase the juice yield.
Be sure to wash off the skin of the lemon before you cut it. This prevents any bacteria or dirt that was on the surface of the lemon from being transferred inside the fruit, and into the food you are going to eat. However you decide to eat lemons, you’re getting a great health food in your diet. So add some to your diet today!…

No Picture
Department Of Health

Water Soluble Vitamins Are Critical to Human Health

Water soluble vitamins must be replenished more often because they are more easily excreted in urine. While there is little worry of overdosing on these vitamins, you have to make sure that you get enough since you can’t really hold onto them.
Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid. It is needed for connective tissue which includes the muscle, fat, and cartilage, and ligament system of the body. Vitamin C is famously known as an immunity booster and immune system helper. If quickens the rate of new cell production, fights allergies, and helps to create new hormones and other chemicals.
Vitamin B1, also known as Thiamin, is in fact a coenzyme that works together with enzymes. It stimulates hunger as well. It is necessary for carbohydrate metabolism, and can help to expel excess water since it is a weak diuretic. Thiamin is everywhere in your body, but the highest amounts are concentrated in the heart, liver, and kidneys. Thiamin is found in whole grains, beans, nuts & seeds, and lean pork. Since most foods are deficient in vitamin B1 due to processing, it is added back into foods such as cereals and breads.
Riboflavin, or vitamin B2, is a sugar attached to a flavanoid. It is a coenzyme which is necessary for digestion of protein and carbohydrates. It also works as a protector of the mucous membranes. Riboflavin is found in animal based foods such as fish, poultry, eggs, meat, and dairy. It is also found in enriched grain foods, dark green vegetables like broccoli and spinach, and in brewer’s yeast. The British and Australian spreads, Marmite & Vegemite, which are made from spent brewer’s yeast, are rich sources.
Niacin is the common name for both nicotinic acid and nicotinamide. Niacin is needed for proper growth and is necessary for the activity of enzymes. There is an enzyme which permits oxygen to enter into body tissues, and this enzyme owes much of its action to niacin. It also stimulates the appetite and the digestion of fats and sugars.
Niacin can be gotten as an intact nutrient or is converted from the amino acid named tryptophan. The whole nutrient comes from meat. Tryptophan is gotten from dairy foods. The only way for the body to extract niacin from certain grains is if they are treated with the mineral lime. This is a method of fortifying grains with niacin.
Vitamin B6, also known as Pyridoxine, is actually a compound consisting of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, and pyridoxamine. It is a component of enzymes which metabolize fats and proteins, and lowers blood levels of homocysteine that is produced when you digest proteins. Too high a level of homocysteine is a marker for heart disease and age related memory loss, so this is an important function of B6. Some other studies refute these findings, but either way we know that B6 is a pretty important vitamin. B6 is in so many common foods, such as liver, pork, lamb, fish, chicken, eggs, milk, whole rice and grains, potatoes, soybeans, nuts & seeds, and dark green vegetables. Refined grain products in the US are fortified with B6.
Folic Acid, also known as folate, is important in DNA synthesis, metabolic assimilation of proteins, and the reorganization of metabolized proteins into new body tissues. This is the process by which living things use consumed protein in order to build new body tissues, or make repairs to existing body tissues. It is also heavily used in pregnancy to create the fetus. Any process which relies on preotein synthesis and building of tissues requires folic acid. Folate is found inDark leafy greens, beans, liver, yeast, and some fruits are rich in folate. Kefir, a middle eastern and eastern European fermented milk beverage, is particularly high in folic acid when it has been fermented for an extra amount of time. This is probably due to the extra beneficial yeasts which are in the fermented drink.
Vitamin B12 is needed for healthy blood cells as well as healthy myelin, the substance that coats and protects nerve cells the way a rubber outer layer protects electrical power and conduction lines. B12 is also known to keep homocystein levels in check. Vitamin B12 is the only vitamin to contain a mineral within. Cobalt is a part of B12. B12’s chemical name is Cyanocobalamin. B12 is not found in plant food sources, and is instead synthesized by intestinal flora, or beneficial gut bacteria. B12 is also found in meat, eggs, and fish. It’s not found in grains but it is added to those products in the United States.
Pantothenic acid is crucial to enzyme activity which process carbohydrates and hormone production. It also stabilizes blood sugar, protects hemoglobin, and fights infection. It is also a protector of nerve, brain, and muscle tissues. It is found in …

No Picture
Health Facts

Denied Health Insurance – What to Do If You Are Denied

You never think about it until it happens to you. You apply for health care coverage fully expecting that you will be covered. Instead, you get a letter or an email informing you that you have been denied health insurance. There are a number of reasons why an insurance provider would deny you coverage. Possibly the top reason is because of a preexisting condition. However, other reasons, such as being overweight and even poor credit, can cause a provider to reject your application. Being denied insurance is not the end of the world. You have several recourses available to you that can help you get the insurance you need.
Talk to the health insurance provider to see why they rejected your application for insurance. Generally, the insurance carrier will tell you why you were denied health insurance. If it is something you can fix, such as being overweight then work on correcting the issue. However, if it due to a preexisting condition, then you will need to take other action. Ask the insurance company if they will insure you based on a contingency, such as a waiting period before they cover the medical bills for your condition.
Another option is to check with other health insurance providers. Each insurance company has their own guidelines when it comes to underwriting a policy. Even though one company may have rejected your application does not mean you will be denied health insurance at all of them. A good way to find out who is willing to extend coverage to you is to visit a website that allows you to get quotes from multiple insurance companies at the same time. Instead of wasting time filling out several applications, you will only have to enter information once and the insurance companies will advise you of their answer. This will save you a lot of time.
If you are still having trouble getting standard insurance from carrier, see if you will qualify under a different type of plan. There are several types of insurance plans you can sign up for including HMO, PPO, Point of Sale, Fee for Service, High Deductible Health Plans, and Catastrophic insurance. You may not get the exact coverage you need but having some coverage is better than being completely uninsured. Lastly, if you continue to be denied health insurance from private insurers, contact your local government assistance office to see if you qualify for a government funded program.
If you need assistance in locating particular coverages at a pre-determined price, we can help you find a reduce health insurance premium today.…

No Picture
Health Food

Health Care Reform For Small Business – Professional Employer Organizations (PEOs) To the Rescue

Professional Employer Organizations offer a one-stop solution for companies averaging 5 to 100 employees. They provide HR consulting, employee benefits, payroll, workers comp insurance, and many other employer-related services. As more regulations are created, and managing them becomes more difficult for employers, the PEO value proposition become more attractive.
2010
A� Small business tax credit – This tax credit is applicable for businesses with less than 25 full-time employees with an average wage below $50,000. The maximum credit equals 35 percent of the employer’s contribution to health insurance premiums, but it is unlikely the maximum credit will be applied. Calculating exactly what an employer qualifies for is an extremely sensitive process.
How PEOs help:
PEOs proactively consider whether their clients qualify for the credit and pass the total amount directly to the client. Since most PEOs manage their clients’ payroll and insurance plans, calculating the credit amount is much easier.
2011
A� W-2 provision – Employers must report the aggregate cost of employer-provided coverage on employees’ W-2s for informational purposes.
How PEOs help:
PEOs manage all aspects of their clients; payroll and benefits, so complying with this provision is synergistically efficient – the amount will be shown on all PEO work-site employees’ paychecks.
A� Wellness Grants are available for businesses with fewer than 100 employees to assist in implementing employee wellness programs. There is $200 million dollars that will be distributed over a five year period.
How PEOs help:
Since many PEOs partially self-insure their health insurance policies, they have always had a vested interest in proving their clients’ employee easy access to wellness programs. Most PEOs have long offered robust wellness programs that help employees live healthier lives, and consequently, make less medical claims – which is cheaper for everyone.
In 2013
A� FSA limits – all employee contributions to the FSA or Flexible Spending Account are limited to $2,500 per year. The penalty for using Flexible Spending Accounts incorrectly will be an increase from 10 percent to 20 percent.
How PEOs help:
PEOs manage all aspects of FSA administration for their clients – all FSAs offered to client employees will be adjusted seamlessly to comply with this provision.
A� Tax increases – Medicare payroll tax increase of 0.9% on self-employed individuals and employees with respect to earnings and wages received during the year above $200,000 for individuals above $250,000 for joint filers will go into effect. The new tax does not change the employer’s tax obligations, but self-employed individuals are not permitted to deduct any portion of the additional tax. In addition, there will be a new 3.8% Medicare contribution on certain unearned income from individuals with AGI over $200,000 ($250,000 for joint filers).
How PEOs help:
Professional Employer Organizations are responsible for deducting and filing all payroll taxes to the appropriate governing body. Unlike a payroll service, PEOs are often responsible and liable for calculating and deducting the proper amounts.
A� Notices & Fines
1. Plan sponsors must supply participants at enrollment or re-enrollment a new form of plan summary that must include information on benefits, exclusions, and cost-sharing requirements. Those that do not comply with this provision are subject to a noncompliance fee of $1,000 for each failure.
2. Employers must provide a written notice regarding the existence of the Insurance Exchange and that the employee might qualify for subsidies by March 1, 2013.
3. Plan sponsors will be required to provide an annual statement to the government and covered individuals reflecting the months during the calendar year for which the individual had “minimum essential coverage”. Those that do not comply with this are subjected to a noncompliance penalty of $50 for each missed statement to an employee to a maximum of $100,000.
How PEOs help:
PEOs are often the plan sponsor for all their clients’ healthcare, unless they “carve out” benefits, which would mean they are not the plan sponsor, and the client maintains their own health insurance. Should a client be receiving healthcare through a PEO sponsored plan, each of these mandates falls squarely on the shoulders of the PEO. Notice the trend, due to co-employment, many of the additional requirements put forth by health care reform are burdens for the PEO.
2014
A� State-based insurance exchanges open – State-based insurance exchanges are planned to pool employers together into one large group much like PEOs have done for years in order to reduce overall premiums. However the exchange program has been attempted in other states and has not had the same success that PEOs have had. As with many public programs, cost-efficiency and timely service is inferior to that offered by private entities. We don’t foresee this principle changing.
How PEOs help:
PEOs have long pooled employers together for cooperative purchases of many items including health insurance, the result is lower cost. There is …